Walking into a dealership usually doesn' evoke a warm fuzzy feelings for most people and even for me and I have been doing it everyday for 14 years- why is that? It's because the sales managers- and sales people on the floor quite often are not really "people people" .
I was amazed at the sour pusses I came across last week as I made my rounds on a crowded auto strip. I visited 17 stores and only 3 had pleasant, smiling people in them when I walked in. These 3 also happened to be the only 3 out of the 17 that at 10 am on a Tuesday were working deals and delivering vehicles- any correlation I wonder- no need to wonder- I am sure of it.

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I have found that anxiety is on both sides. You as a representive and also the customer. So what i like too do is introduce customers to most people in showroom unless busy. Like its your house and your introducing family members, It just seems to be kinda corny but works and then not everyone is starring at them. I also see alot of salespeople not confident or again anxious. That first 5 mins in so crucial.....
Yuri-

You are dead on- that first five minutes is critical (Statistically it's 90 seconds) considering what the customer is walking in with already in their heads, "if Im not careful I will be ripped off, can't trust car people, they are all about the sale"....blah blah blah!.....add to that what is happening in the head of the sales person- the noise in their heads- its no wonder that there is such discomfort- I like you approach- to take the "ick" out of the moment. Treat it like its your homes foyer- viola' disarming! Add to that a lot of genuine smiles (something we need to remember) and you have a less stressful 5 minutes and the foundation for a "meaningful relationship". Thanks for your comment!
Wendi

yuri sheaffer said:
I have found that anxiety is on both sides. You as a representive and also the customer. So what i like too do is introduce customers to most people in showroom unless busy. Like its your house and your introducing family members, It just seems to be kinda corny but works and then not everyone is starring at them. I also see alot of salespeople not confident or again anxious. That first 5 mins in so crucial.....
Your first impression is always your last. Before you approach a potential customer they have already pre judged you by appearance. A smile and opening question such as "What information may I provide you with"? Is always a wall breaker! I agree that a women client is one of the most important potential consumers a retailer can have. Regardless if they are alone , majority of the purchase decision is theirs alone. As a sales manager I embrace every opprtunity that comes my way. As a luxury automotive retailer you never know who is going to walk through that door "Never Judge a BOOK by it's cover"

Our sales staff is critical to first impressions. A consumer can figure out within 5 minutes if they would like to do business with you. The moment they walk in put on a Broad Way show and wait for the applause!
The Customer has changed What About the Dealership isn’t it about time the dealership changed.
After visiting hundreds of dealerships in the last 14 years I find the same thing as I did when I got in the business 30 years ago. The way the customer is treated is getting worse; the dealerships are not getting better. The customer is scared and defensive however, we do nothing to ease that feeling. Why because all we are thinking about is making the sales for the commission. This leads to a loss for the Customer, Dealership and the Salesperson. You might make the sale today but most of the time you lose because you did not make a customer for life. Even when the customer buys, most of the time everyone still loses There are a few exceptions but if a dealership is set up to work as a true team not as competitors everyone can win every time.
I would appreciate your direct feedback on how you have been treated at a dealership of how your dealership treats customers differently.
Thank you.
Mike Scott
Mike,
When are we gonna get this? I totally agree with you and would love to hear from ONE store who identified this, articulated it to it's people, determined a solution, implemented it and improved the sales experience-
and made that "hair on the back of the neck" feeling most people get when they walk into a store ....go away....
The company that was promoting my Commercial Vehicle Management Program went out of business so I went back to a dealership. What a mistake, dealerships have not changed the way they treat customers since the 80s. I think they are much worse now, and then they were when I started.
I have decided to start my training company back up to change the way dealership operate and treat their customers. Dealerships and their management focus on the profit of the deal not the overall profit of the dealership. I have always believed and teach that if you take care of the customer the money will follow. I’m looking for a new agent to promote my training if you know any let me know.
Read and follow the links in this letter I wrote to dealers last night to remind them of their customer’s perception of their dealership.

"Difficult times lead to creativity," says Bill Gerhard, AAA's director of financial services . "People come up with sensational hooks to try and get you to the dealerships, and once they lure you in, the goal is to sell you something and generate as much profit for the dealership as they can."
What your dealership does or does not do, is not the problem.
It is the customer’s perception of your dealership that matters.
This is on MSN.com, it is an article from Forbes.com “Car Dealer Scams to Avoid”.
http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/SavingandDebt/SaveMoney/car-de...

Forbes.com – Warning to Buyers
http://www.forbes.com/2010/03/11/car-dealer-scams-lifestyle-vehicle... - Slide Show

1. The Ambush – Flipping the Customer from Salesman to Salesman to Manager
2. The Confiscation – Taking the Customers Keys
3. The Bum Rush – Pushing the Customer to make a deal today
4. The Buried Bill – Adding items like Alarms, etching, prepping, in the contract
5. The Bait and Switch – Switching the Customer off the Sales Car
6. The Negotiation – Talking about terms instead of price
7. The Requirement – Asking for SS# or credit report before needed
8. The Loan Shark – Offering to pay of loan or credit cards
9. The Lemon – “As Is” deal
10. The Credit App – “All Credit Applications Accepted”

Forbes’ top 10-list of warning is the operating procedure that has been taught to salespeople for years. This is the “Standard Operating Procedures” that the management knows and follows.

Does that mean it is right? Your Customers think not. If you want to change the perception most people have of your dealership you need to change the way you do business and advertise that fact.
To change your dealerships, perception, procedures, attract more customers and not be part of the problem. Instead be one of the great dealer operators that truly respect and appreciation their customers business with their actions not just their words. Install the ScottSalesSystem.

MikeScott@ScottSalesSystem.com
www.ScottSalesSystem.com





Wendi Venable said:
Mike,
When are we gonna get this? I totally agree with you and would love to hear from ONE store who identified this, articulated it to it's people, determined a solution, implemented it and improved the sales experience-
and made that "hair on the back of the neck" feeling most people get when they walk into a store ....go away....
Would love to chat with you sometime! I am 100% in your corner on that one- where are you located Mike?

Mike Scott said:
The company that was promoting my Commercial Vehicle Management Program went out of business so I went back to a dealership. What a mistake, dealerships have not changed the way they treat customers since the 80s. I think they are much worse now, and then they were when I started.
I have decided to start my training company back up to change the way dealership operate and treat their customers. Dealerships and their management focus on the profit of the deal not the overall profit of the dealership. I have always believed and teach that if you take care of the customer the money will follow. I’m looking for a new agent to promote my training if you know any let me know.
Read and follow the links in this letter I wrote to dealers last night to remind them of their customer’s perception of their dealership.

"Difficult times lead to creativity," says Bill Gerhard, AAA's director of financial services . "People come up with sensational hooks to try and get you to the dealerships, and once they lure you in, the goal is to sell you something and generate as much profit for the dealership as they can."
What your dealership does or does not do, is not the problem.
It is the customer’s perception of your dealership that matters.
This is on MSN.com, it is an article from Forbes.com “Car Dealer Scams to Avoid”.
http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/SavingandDebt/SaveMoney/car-de...

Forbes.com – Warning to Buyers
http://www.forbes.com/2010/03/11/car-dealer-scams-lifestyle-vehicle... - Slide Show

1. The Ambush – Flipping the Customer from Salesman to Salesman to Manager
2. The Confiscation – Taking the Customers Keys
3. The Bum Rush – Pushing the Customer to make a deal today
4. The Buried Bill – Adding items like Alarms, etching, prepping, in the contract
5. The Bait and Switch – Switching the Customer off the Sales Car
6. The Negotiation – Talking about terms instead of price
7. The Requirement – Asking for SS# or credit report before needed
8. The Loan Shark – Offering to pay of loan or credit cards
9. The Lemon – “As Is” deal
10. The Credit App – “All Credit Applications Accepted”

Forbes’ top 10-list of warning is the operating procedure that has been taught to salespeople for years. This is the “Standard Operating Procedures” that the management knows and follows.

Does that mean it is right? Your Customers think not. If you want to change the perception most people have of your dealership you need to change the way you do business and advertise that fact.
To change your dealerships, perception, procedures, attract more customers and not be part of the problem. Instead be one of the great dealer operators that truly respect and appreciation their customers business with their actions not just their words. Install the ScottSalesSystem.

MikeScott@ScottSalesSystem.com
www.ScottSalesSystem.com





Wendi Venable said:
Mike,
When are we gonna get this? I totally agree with you and would love to hear from ONE store who identified this, articulated it to it's people, determined a solution, implemented it and improved the sales experience-
and made that "hair on the back of the neck" feeling most people get when they walk into a store ....go away....
I live in the Phoenix, AZ area. MikeScott@ScottSalesSystem.com

Mike Scott said:
The company that was promoting my Commercial Vehicle Management Program went out of business so I went back to a dealership. What a mistake, dealerships have not changed the way they treat customers since the 80s. I think they are much worse now, and then they were when I started.
I have decided to start my training company back up to change the way dealership operate and treat their customers. Dealerships and their management focus on the profit of the deal not the overall profit of the dealership. I have always believed and teach that if you take care of the customer the money will follow. I’m looking for a new agent to promote my training if you know any let me know.
Read and follow the links in this letter I wrote to dealers last night to remind them of their customer’s perception of their dealership.

"Difficult times lead to creativity," says Bill Gerhard, AAA's director of financial services . "People come up with sensational hooks to try and get you to the dealerships, and once they lure you in, the goal is to sell you something and generate as much profit for the dealership as they can."
What your dealership does or does not do, is not the problem.
It is the customer’s perception of your dealership that matters.
This is on MSN.com, it is an article from Forbes.com “Car Dealer Scams to Avoid”.
http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/SavingandDebt/SaveMoney/car-de...

Forbes.com – Warning to Buyers
http://www.forbes.com/2010/03/11/car-dealer-scams-lifestyle-vehicle... - Slide Show

1. The Ambush – Flipping the Customer from Salesman to Salesman to Manager
2. The Confiscation – Taking the Customers Keys
3. The Bum Rush – Pushing the Customer to make a deal today
4. The Buried Bill – Adding items like Alarms, etching, prepping, in the contract
5. The Bait and Switch – Switching the Customer off the Sales Car
6. The Negotiation – Talking about terms instead of price
7. The Requirement – Asking for SS# or credit report before needed
8. The Loan Shark – Offering to pay of loan or credit cards
9. The Lemon – “As Is” deal
10. The Credit App – “All Credit Applications Accepted”

Forbes’ top 10-list of warning is the operating procedure that has been taught to salespeople for years. This is the “Standard Operating Procedures” that the management knows and follows.

Does that mean it is right? Your Customers think not. If you want to change the perception most people have of your dealership you need to change the way you do business and advertise that fact.
To change your dealerships, perception, procedures, attract more customers and not be part of the problem. Instead be one of the great dealer operators that truly respect and appreciation their customers business with their actions not just their words. Install the ScottSalesSystem.

MikeScott@ScottSalesSystem.com
www.ScottSalesSystem.com





Wendi Venable said:
Mike,
When are we gonna get this? I totally agree with you and would love to hear from ONE store who identified this, articulated it to it's people, determined a solution, implemented it and improved the sales experience-
and made that "hair on the back of the neck" feeling most people get when they walk into a store ....go away....
What a worthwhile discussion! So happy to hear that this feeling isn't exclusive to me. I've been in the auto industry for 11 years, worked inside dealerships in F&I until February this year. I also developed a training program that I moved online in 2008, to help F&I managers improve their sales skills while remaining professional and ethical. Would be very interested to hear more about your program Mike. Even today when I visit stores, I often get that uneasiness when I walk through the door. The change has to come, buyers will not stand for this forever.
The idea is to stop hiring and training people as salespeople that will never make it. Hire and train college students, homemaker’s, people that are good with people and teach them what to say and do. At no time do they try to sell anything all they do is assist the customer with finding the vehicle that fills the desire to own.

If these people want to become a salesperson they will on their own learn how. If you look at network marketing, the concept is to have people introduce their friends to the product. This works somewhat the same except at no time until the customer ask for a salesperson are they subject to the sales tactics. By teaching this system, it will not be long before the student becomes the teacher and the dealership has only people that do not pressure but assist. They all treat everyone with Deep "Respect and Appreciation".

I am looking for someone to become my agent and help me find (8) eight dealers that what to become the leaders in this way of doing business. Pass this on it you would.

Look at attached file for more information.

Cathy Aron said:
What a worthwhile discussion! So happy to hear that this feeling isn't exclusive to me. I've been in the auto industry for 11 years, worked inside dealerships in F&I until February this year. I also developed a training program that I moved online in 2008, to help F&I managers improve their sales skills while remaining professional and ethical. Would be very interested to hear more about your program Mike. Even today when I visit stores, I often get that uneasiness when I walk through the door. The change has to come, buyers will not stand for this forever.
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People for about 8 years now have been screaming to dealerships across the country "YOU AREN'T SELLING ME ANYTHING- I AM B U Y I N G-." we need to stop selling and start assisting. An automotive professional that assists people in THEIR buying process- and is NOT selling will quickly realize that the "sale" is just a natural progression- YES even if your price can be beat down the street. Check out the statistics- and why people buy - its mind blowing

Mike Scott said:
The idea is to stop hiring and training people as salespeople that will never make it. Hire and train college students, homemaker’s, people that are good with people and teach them what to say and do. At no time do they try to sell anything all they do is assist the customer with finding the vehicle that fills the desire to own.

If these people want to become a salesperson they will on their own learn how. If you look at network marketing, the concept is to have people introduce their friends to the product. This works somewhat the same except at no time until the customer ask for a salesperson are they subject to the sales tactics. By teaching this system, it will not be long before the student becomes the teacher and the dealership has only people that do not pressure but assist. They all treat everyone with Deep "Respect and Appreciation".

I am looking for someone to become my agent and help me find (8) eight dealers that what to become the leaders in this way of doing business. Pass this on it you would.

Look at attached file for more information.

Cathy Aron said:
What a worthwhile discussion! So happy to hear that this feeling isn't exclusive to me. I've been in the auto industry for 11 years, worked inside dealerships in F&I until February this year. I also developed a training program that I moved online in 2008, to help F&I managers improve their sales skills while remaining professional and ethical. Would be very interested to hear more about your program Mike. Even today when I visit stores, I often get that uneasiness when I walk through the door. The change has to come, buyers will not stand for this forever.
I often say to sales "men"...Have you ever tried to break into a grouping of women at a bar? Would you feel comfortable walking up to a group of 10 women all huddled together and saying "Hi"? The honest answer for most would be "No, I would never feel comfortable or even attempt it".
So I ask, how do you think a women feels when she drives on to a dealers lot and has the same experience? Or at least views it as such.

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