New Consultant needs support T.O.'ing Customers "Best Practices".

I am new to auto sales and my management keep telling me that No One walks till they talk to the people. While it sounds good in theory I am having a hard time getting these customers in the door to TO them. I have tried a few different approaches and sometimes it works, but I am tired of getting chewed out for not getting my managers involved.

Any ideas or suggestionas would be helpful?

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Outstanding question!

At this stage in the game if you're new as you state you are and your Managers are not out on the lot to ensure your customers don't walk, I would partner up with the best sales person you can find and shadow them until you can handle this type of scenario yourself.

There is a method to burning and turning. Better to be Pro Active vs Re Active. Trust me when I tell you, half deals are better than no deals.... The earlier involvement from a Pro the BETTER...

Great way to reach out, and welcome to the Automotive industry...

Hi Jon, this is very common. Many times the reason why new sales consultants have trouble  getting "cooperative" customers is because they have not taken enough time to become a real person to the customer. Many times we treat customers like "one night stands" meaning we introduce ourselves and then get right down to business. You have to find common ground with your customers. Become Jon to your customers and shatter their preconceived notions of another salesperson out there giving one liners and trying to screw them. Remember you are a problem solver, listen to their needs, address their wants, and you will be able to solve their problems better. You will have your occassional customers that will burn off on you, but you will find with experience you will have fewer cases of it. I agree with Bobby also, partner up with an experienced proven sales person who can give you some pointers and show you how it is done. One book I just read is, "So you are new to sales" by Bryan Flanagan. 13 years on the blacktop, I still got some very good info from it.

Email me your address and I will burn the audio version and send it to you. Good luck Jon, make us proud!

 

If you can't get them inside try telling them that you need to check on something and ask them to wait just a second. Then go in and get one of your managers to come out to them. Just be sure you don't say "let me get my manager", nothing will make a  customer bolt faster than the fear of meeting a closer.

No technique works 100% of the time...  Very few work (if any) if you haven't built trust and rapport with your customer.

 

Here's something to consider:

 

 - Tell your customer that you have some information you'd like to give them and ask them to accompany you inside.  It's not important that you identify what the information is unless they ask.  

 

 - Upon entering the showroom, guide them to a suitable waiting area and ask them to wait jsut a moment.  Tell them you'll be RIGHT BACK!

 

 - Quickly, go get a brochure, a magazine article on the car they're looking at, or simply write down a website address - possibly the manufacturer's -  on the back of your business card (you'll suggest they later visit the site for additional information about the model they're inquiring in).  It doesn't really matter, just get something that may be of interest to them.

 

 - Prior to returning to your customer, have a very short chat with your sales manager. Give him/her the most important details about your customer and what you have done in about a minute (or less).  

 

- Escort him/her to your customer and perform introductions.  Tell your customer that you wanted to make certain they had another contact at the dealership should they return, or need answers on something, if you were not there at the time.   Of course, don't forget to give them the information you went to obtain.

 

 - Try this and see how it works.  As I said, no technique works every time but this will improve your odds.  I'll tell you what doesn't work... telling your customer that your boss says every customer needs to see him/her before leaving!

 

Good Luck!

Very good question and here is a simple technique I hope will help. The time to turn or TO a customer is not when you have wrung out every last second of their patience. The correct time is immediately upon not being able to move the sale to the next step. Then, when that occurs simply say in a very direct matter "you know...I've got a great idea for you, I'll be right back". Then you turn and go get your manager or an experienced sales person, whichever your manager deems appropriate. They then need to go to where the customer is and start over. I hope this helps. Good luck and sell like crazy.

All above comments are great, but I have to repeat what Keith Hawk said. Once you have begun developing a relationship and have professionally conducted a demonstation drive, firmly say to the customer, "Follow me, and I'll....."  On a Used Vehicle, you should complete this sentence with, "....show you exactly what we did to recondition this vehicle." On a New Vehicle, there are numerous methods of completion, such as "....show you why ABC Motors is the leading Flubber Dealer in the Southeast."

 

Say it (just the one sentence...nothing else), and take off walking toward your sales office. The customer(s) WILL FOLLOW! I guarantee it!

 

Good Luck and Good Selling! It's a Great Business!

 

Garry House (50 Year Veteran)

Thanks for the pointers. That makes alot of sense to me, and I will try to take more time to learn about the customers and their needs. Also, I actually have an account on Audible.com where they have alot of audiobooks on sales. I have "So You're New To Sales" along with alot of Brian Tracy, Zig Ziglar, I have books from Joe Girard, Grant Cardone, and some other sales trainers. They help with alot of other areas, but they don't really touch on TO'ing. Thanks alot though.
Marsh Buice said:

Hi Jon, this is very common. Many times the reason why new sales consultants have trouble  getting "cooperative" customers is because they have not taken enough time to become a real person to the customer. Many times we treat customers like "one night stands" meaning we introduce ourselves and then get right down to business. You have to find common ground with your customers. Become Jon to your customers and shatter their preconceived notions of another salesperson out there giving one liners and trying to screw them. Remember you are a problem solver, listen to their needs, address their wants, and you will be able to solve their problems better. You will have your occassional customers that will burn off on you, but you will find with experience you will have fewer cases of it. I agree with Bobby also, partner up with an experienced proven sales person who can give you some pointers and show you how it is done. One book I just read is, "So you are new to sales" by Bryan Flanagan. 13 years on the blacktop, I still got some very good info from it.

Email me your address and I will burn the audio version and send it to you. Good luck Jon, make us proud!

 

Number 1...Great job on reaching out instead of giving up..

 

Number 2... It's too bad you don't have enough trust with your managers to ask them that same question because when you  are a new sales person the T.O. part of the process is SOOOOO important.

 

I hate typing so what I would like for you to do if you'd like is call me and we can go over some scenarios that you are having difficulty with..

 

My direct line is 847-304-3048

 

The car business is too fun to leave it to chance, Look forward to talking!

 

CJ

 

 

Jon,

 

Welcome to the car bizz =) Do not give up on it as it is very rewarding.

Pertaining to your question though. You must stay confident and persistant (not Pushy). Grab one of the other salesman or your

manager and role play through the whole process. Ask them to cretique you as you go thru it, and then keep PRACTICING it over

and over and over. Selling as you know is a process  and your manager must first teach you that. You have to want to be the best

at what you do, so ask your manager to help you with ongoing training show him you are eager and willing to learn. If he/she will

not help, Invest in yourself. Their is a lot of good quality trainers today. And if you are still having trouble, touch the desk before you

take your next up and tell your manager to watch you and ask him for some help. The manager is your coach and that consist of

teaching (or what I like to call training) all the other stuff he does is not as important as selling cars and managing the process.

 

Good luck and hope to hear some success stories!

Jon

 

Best thing to do is get the prospect in the showroom and sit them down first.  That is accomplished by a weclome and then a open ended question/statement. 

 

Do you know about or did you hear about "OUR UNIQUE VALUE PROPOSTION", come with me.....

 

Sit the prospect down and tell them the dealership story and then your story.  Then ask a series of CONSULATIVE questions RE thier want and needs.

 

Take that info to the desk and then select a vehicle that meet thier needs and go get it for a demo while client is at the your desk.  When you get back, direct the prospect COME WITH ME.

 

 

Jon,

One of the best ways to help you out is NEVER give the consumer your business card when yu first meet them. When they get ready to leave and you can't get them to come inside so you can TO to the manager tell them to hold up you need to go get a business card for them. Most people will be nice enough to wait for you to get them a card. That gives you your out to go and get the manager and let him or her kno whats going on. Then they can come outside to speak with your consumer. That is 1 litte thing that you can do to help you with getting 100% TO's.

 

You are exactly the type of person we all look to hire, someone who is truly looking to excel in

our business. I applaud you my friend. While I try to be aware of when my new salespeople are with

a customer, and often go out and say "hi" early on in the early stage, I dont know that your dealership

affords this opportunity to the management.

 One thing I found worked well for me when I started was the business card. Most customers will ask

for a card, "usually as permission to leave". If you just pull one out, they are gone, if you say "I'm sorry,

I don't have one on me (and dont carry them), let me grab one off my desk, most customers will wait for

you to get a card. This will afford you an opportunity to at least give the manager a chance to come out.

 Thanks again for caring enough about your career to reach out for assistance, and should you move to CO.

let me know.

Matt

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